Nellie's Free Range Eggs

certified-humane

Egg Yolk Color

Egg Yolk Color and Richness

We frequently receive compliments about the dark, rich color of our egg yolks, especially when compared to the light, pale egg yolks from factory farms.

What causes a richer, darker egg yolk color?

The answer is, not surprisingly, the hen’s diet. Our Nellie’s Free Range hens receive a high-quality feed mixture of protein sources, minerals, and essential elements to help them thrive. But, contrary to what some people think, hens are not vegetarians. The feed they get at Nellie’s is vegetarian and contains no animal by-products (or antibiotics), but when they get to head outside every day, the world is their oyster, so to speak. They love to nibble on clover and whatever other tasty flora they can find in the pasture. They also love to eat worms and insects, which is another great source of protein for them.

The combination of our healthy feed mix and whatever they can forage for outside is what creates the deep, full egg yolk color you see.

Are darker egg yolks more nutritious?

You can’t judge on that basis alone, but more than likely, darker yolks like ours have been fed a richer, healthier diet.

We’re proud of the free range lives our hens lead and we love that their happiness can translate into your happiness with a better egg.

Eat Eggs, Be Healthy

For many years, eggs were considered a cholesterol-packed villain in the story of you versus heart disease, and many people erroneously limited – or altogether avoided – eggs as a part of their regular heart healthy diet.

Now a report from a panel of U.S. nutrition and medical experts is debunking that myth for good. Dietary Guidelines for Americans, a federal publication that has far-reaching impact on our food choices, announced “cholesterol is not considered a nutrient of concern for overconsumption.” Meaning, eggs can shake off the bad reputation and be recognized as a nutritious and convenient part of your healthy, well-balanced diet.

And there’s more! According to CNN, the report also identifies under-consumed “shortfall nutrients,” including vitamins A, D, and E, as well as folate, calcium, magnesium, and potassium. You can find all of these nutrients and a slew of others in – you guessed it – EGGS!  To read the complete article from CNN, click here: “Cholesterol in food not a concern, new report says

So go ahead. Crack in to our eggs for breakfast, for dinner, or anytime. They’re good for you!

To read more about the nutritional benefits of eggs for you and your family, click here